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threlayer
05-01-2009, 02:25 PM
Will there be another state to allow prostitution in some form? Which state and when? Should it expand?

Even those that have relaxed those laws still have substantial controls in place. Will similar law relaxation expand someday? The public accepts a lot of sexuality already.

I don't think this wrecks marriages any more than does affairs and bad attitudes, and I figure one day it will expand. Further capitalism and entrepreneurship are already very strong in the USA.

Paris
05-01-2009, 04:30 PM
Maybe Iowa. They pushed Obama on to the white house and legalized gay marriage last week. They might as well go for the whole legalized prostitution thing too. Heck, maybe the state legislature will pass a vice bill legalizing marijuana and hookers all at the same time.;D

hockeybobby
05-02-2009, 08:54 AM
Legalize, regulate and tax prostitution in all it's various forms, and drugs as well.

bem401
05-02-2009, 09:16 AM
Rhode Island is currently in the process of closing out the loophole that has made indoor prostitution legal for the last 5 years or so. Presently anything that occurs indoors is now not prosecutable. That includes escorting, massage parlors, and anything that happens in the clubs. The law was passed out of committee last week and will be voted on in the coming weeks. RI is quite possibly the most liberal state in the country, so if anyone is suggesting that this lurch to the left the country is currently experiencing might lead to a relaxation in this area, you might want to rethink that.
I think they might have almost simultaneously passed a law allowing for medical marijuana, but ( not being a weed-smoker ) I didn't pay much attention to that.

Golden_Rule
05-02-2009, 10:26 AM
One must acknowledge historical trends.

This country has always historically trended toward heavy judeo-christian religious overtones. No matter how much we think that we separate church and state in this nation a country that puts "IN GOD WE TRUST" on its money isn't ever but a stones throw away from a theocracy.

Never has that been more true in this nation than in the last twenty years.

So the notion that there may be some form of enlightened governing which would allow adult persons to decide - fully unencumbered by the state - what they would do sexually, including legally turn their sexuality into a form of commerce, is highly unlikely.

Kylea2
05-02-2009, 10:48 AM
^^^ Very true!

We are still far too ruled by religion to legalize such things in most states.

It's interesting to note though how different cities within the same state can be. For example Colorado Springs is very Christian and VERY conservative, while Denver & Boulder are both VERY liberal to the point that Denver legalized marijuana of less tha 1 ounce and I see people in Boulder smoking it on the court steps! Of course it's still illegal within the state because only the city law changed, not the state - but the fine isn't as heavy.

So I doubt it would be fully legalized in another state anytime soon, but possibly legalized in a single city.

Golden_Rule
05-02-2009, 12:51 PM
So I doubt it would be fully legalized in another state anytime soon, but possibly legalized in a single city.

Could be but I wouldn't think by out and out changing of laws.

More likely, as has already been the case, various cities would unofficially decriminalize it by changes to their internal enforcement policies.

San Francisco has, off and on, basically allowed prostitution within various zones of its jurisdiction.

NYC as well during brief stints.

It wasn't that it was legal. City enforcement units simply turned a blind eye to its taking place.

In the 70's and early 80's street prostitution in some parts of NYC was rampant. it wasn't like the police couldn't go out and round up dozens, of not hundreds, of street walkers every night. They walked about half naked, boldly stating their business. Guys walked about with handouts in front of the quickie joints they were advertising.

It brought in the tourists and the then Mayors of the time wanted it controlled but not to go away. Now its Disney instead. [Candidly, I can't say which was worse. They are both their own forms of Hell.]

Kylea2
05-02-2009, 11:13 PM
San Francisco has, off and on, basically allowed prostitution within various zones of its jurisdiction.

NYC as well during brief stints.

It wasn't that it was legal. City enforcement units simply turned a blind eye to its taking place.


San Francisco is a whole different animal. Prostitution is rampant there, including plenty of prostitutes (men & women) walking the streets. It's very much out in the open. The city has gone back and forth on how liberal it is though, and it just happens to be very liberal right now. I expect it will swing back into a more conservative mindset as it has always done though.

threlayer
05-03-2009, 05:47 PM
The US by and large is certainly a very conservative country in that way. Maybe now that we certainly have had enough of government by moralistic laws in the last few years, the 'pendulum' will swing the other way for a while.

I wouldn't mind that, but I would mind on-the-street pandering.

yoda57us
05-06-2009, 06:30 PM
No, they won't...

Smokeless
05-12-2009, 12:18 AM
Too many "victimless" acts are criminalized. But that won't change any time soon.

Paris
05-12-2009, 05:00 AM
As I gaze in my crystal ball, I see a crack down on sexually oriented businesses in the near future. For now it isn't on anyone's radar because of the current economic collapse. But once people start feeling stable in their jobs and businesses, you can bet that the morality police will be out in full force again. Probably sooner than you think.

The republican party is having spasms about what ideology to adopt in this new liberal era. One can also see how liberals are opposed to prostitution, not because of the religious edicts but because of the human rights abuses that occur in the sex trade. They'll (republican party) come to the conclusion sooner or later that they need to shut down all those filthy strip clubs and web sites, and a lot of Americans of all political leanings will get behind them on that effort.

It will start somewhere very conservative leaning, like Florida and move like a wave across the country. Just look at the gay rights movement. It started slowly at first, but now it is moving very rapidly. Pretty soon, I'm sure there is going to be a federal law enacting equal rights to gay couples, possibly as an constitutional amendment. In order to get that passed, and I'm sure that republican lawmakers are more sensible than the majority of their current constituency, they will have to have a rallying cry that calls attention to a "real" problem in the US, like prostitution.

Being as most people don't understand the distinction between strippers and hookers, which happens to be quite understandable in the current club atmosphere, laws will get passed all over the country to shut down clubs. Considering the economy will be humming right along by then, most clubs will close voluntarily or change their venue format due to the lack of available talent.

This is cyclical. We just happen to be approaching a breaking point now.

Earl_the_Pearl
05-14-2009, 02:55 PM
v Pretty soon, I'm sure there is going to be a federal law enacting equal rights to gay couples, possibly as an constitutional amendment.

If the voters in California voted for a state constitutional amendment stating marriage is between a man and a woman there is 0% chance of a federal amendment passing stating the opposite.

lestat1
05-27-2009, 04:21 PM
They won't, but they should go back to the way things used to be. The US has a long history of prostitution and brothels that only came to an end during World War I when more soldiers were in hospitals due to syphilis than to battle wounds. We have condoms and more advanced medicine than we did in WWI, so the rationale that originally made it illegal is no longer valid. In the meantime, however, we managed to come up with other reasons. Crap.

liberator
05-30-2009, 06:10 PM
Many states leave the spas alone including many southern states like Georgia.

CFMNH44
06-19-2009, 07:01 AM
New England Cable News yesterday had a segment on the likely passage of the new law, quoting the governor that proudly claimed Rhode Island will no longer be like 'certain counties in Nevada' that have no law against it. They showed a female hair stylist that 'would do anything she could' to close what she referred to as Asian Massage Parlor businesses on her street. I wonder if she would feel the same if PETA demanded she be closed for violating animals in the testing products she uses? The reporter also referenced the recent Craig’s List assault on a prostitute in RI as a reason. They said that the ‘police could do little to stop prostitution’ until the new law was passed. No reason was given why it should be stopped. Maybe I'm showing my ignorance or maybe I have become too libertarian that I don't think the government should dictate what adults choose to do?government should dictate what people can do?

bem401
06-20-2009, 09:57 AM
New England Cable News yesterday had a segment on the likely passage of the new law, quoting the governor that proudly claimed Rhode Island will no longer be like 'certain counties in Nevada' that have no law against it. They showed a female hair stylist that 'would do anything she could' to close what she referred to as Asian Massage Parlor businesses on her street. I wonder if she would feel the same if PETA demanded she be closed for violating animals in the testing products she uses? The reporter also referenced the recent Craig’s List assault on a prostitute in RI as a reason. They said that the ‘police could do little to stop prostitution’ until the new law was passed. No reason was given why it should be stopped. Maybe I'm showing my ignorance or maybe I have become too libertarian that I don't think the government should dictate what adults choose to do?government should dictate what people can do?

No guarantees on the prostitution law being enacted in RI. The human trafficking law is a near-certainty though.

They'll probably hit a few AMP's and leave the clubs alone even if the prostitution law passes. This is RI. All the SC's are well-enough connected to avoid raids. I have friends in LE who said they couldn't care less about what goes on inside the clubs. LE gets security details in the clubs on weekends and several are patrons during the week.

yoda57us
06-20-2009, 12:59 PM
They showed a female hair stylist that 'would do anything she could' to close what she referred to as Asian Massage Parlor businesses on her street. I wonder if she would feel the same if PETA demanded she be closed for violating animals in the testing products she uses? The reporter also referenced the recent Craig’s List assault on a prostitute in RI as a reason.

Point one:
I'm willing to bet that if you owned a business that was patronized primarily by women next to an AMP you would be trying to get it closed as well.

Point two:
In the 21st century many companies manufacture and market products for the professional cosmetologist that are not developed with the use of animal testing. Let's not cloud the issue with your personal agenda...

stressed
06-21-2009, 09:38 AM
The republican party is having spasms about what ideology to adopt in this new liberal era. One can also see how liberals are opposed to prostitution, not because of the religious edicts but because of the human rights abuses that occur in the sex trade. They'll (republican party) come to the conclusion sooner or later that they need to shut down all those filthy strip clubs and web sites, and a lot of Americans of all political leanings will get behind them on that effort.

Just a little pet peeve here.....In my experience the majority of republicans are fiscally concervative and all over the place on social issues. Just like the democratic party, the republicans have a few nuts spouting off more than anyone else and are labeled as our leaders.

I am a fiscal conservative of course, but thats it, the only thing i care about is uncle sam staying out of my pocket. I owe no one anything and i pay way too much in taxes. No one will ever convince me that i should give money that i earned to someone that sits on their ass all day.

Back to my peeve---there are just as many democrats that would go after strip clubs as republicans....some of the most judgemental people i know are democrats

the majority of normal conservatives and blue dog democrats do not spout off, we just want to be left alone.

Earl_the_Pearl
06-22-2009, 08:57 PM
Point one:
I'm willing to bet that if you owned a business that was patronized primarily by women next to an AMP you would be trying to get it closed as well.

Point two:
In the 21st century many companies manufacture and market products for the professional cosmetologist that are not developed with the use of animal testing.
Well that hair dresser should be shut down because of the evil that goes on behind the walls. Yes I'm talking about braiding of hair.

1Ti 2:9 Likewise, I want women to adorn themselves with proper clothing, modestly and discreetly, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly garments,

bem401
07-01-2009, 05:17 AM
It appears the effort to criminalize indoor prostitution in RI has failed (stalled actually) for the time being. The General Assembly adjourned yesterday without enacting the law. Its possible they could return for a special session at some point in the near future to close the loophole, but who knows.

yoda57us
07-01-2009, 12:06 PM
It appears the effort to criminalize indoor prostitution in RI has failed (stalled actually) for the time being. The General Assembly adjourned yesterday without enacting the law. Its possible they could return for a special session at some point in the near future to close the loophole, but who knows.

I haven't been to RI much the last year or so but I wonder if the general public actually cares all that much about the loophole? It seems, based on what I read on various boards, that there are more hookers working in the clubs and in AMPS than there are on the street. Ultimately, streetwalkers are what the voting public complains about. The legislature may actually be smart enough to realize that things are good for them the way it is...

bem401
07-01-2009, 03:13 PM
I haven't been to RI much the last year or so but I wonder if the general public actually cares all that much about the loophole? It seems, based on what I read on various boards, that there are more hookers working in the clubs and in AMPS than there are on the street. Ultimately, streetwalkers are what the voting public complains about. The legislature may actually be smart enough to realize that things are good for them the way it is...

Two factors seem to be at play:

1. The (perceived?) human trafficking issue as regards AMP's.

2. The Craig's List killer actually robbed and assaulted an escort in RI (did that make the Boston news?)at about the same time he committed that MA murder, so that fired up even more people.

The incident in RI really put the loophole in the spotlight. I'd bet 98% of the people in RI were not even aware of the loophole until then. Once the word got out, the usual suspects ( media personalities and pols ) got up on their high moral horses and led the charge.

Streetwalking would appear to be non-existent in Providence these days as one might expect.

Lately, it seems any attempts by management to curtail what happens in the clubs has gone right out the window. CL now supposedly gives CH a run for its money in the extras department ( so I'm told ). Maybe this was just a last rush as the law was expected to be passed by yesterday.

You might be the first person to ever wonder if our General Assembly was "smart", btw. They are anything but that. They just had too many other pressing issues, namely the budget and Twin Rivers (and ridiculous things like changing the state name), to reconcile the two bills that were submitted regarding indoor prostitution. That and privately I don't think they care all that much anyhow.

I do think you are right though. Passing the law will only put more hookers on the street once they start raiding AMP's and the clubs stop turning a blind eye to what's going on. So in that regard, prostitution will become more visible to the general public with passage of the law.

There is one club in town that needs to be concerned once the law passes and it isn't the Pink Palace. The authorities have had a hard-on for CL since they finagled that liquor license while no one was paying attention. They'll probably be targeted along with the AMP's if and when the raids ever start.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-01-2009, 06:15 PM
From what I have read the big difference in the two bills was what penalty, if any, were the owners of property to get if prostitution were found there.

yoda57us
07-01-2009, 06:36 PM
Two factors seem to be at play:

1. The (perceived?) human trafficking issue as regards AMP's.

2. The Craig's List killer actually robbed and assaulted an escort in RI (did that make the Boston news?)at about the same time he committed that MA murder, so that fired up even more people.


The CL killer's assault on the girl in Warwick was all over the news in Boston as well. The security camera photos from both the Mass and RI attacks made it pretty clear that it was the same guy.

As far as the human trafficking issues, I can tell you that I've seen it and been told of it first hand by a lady who survived it. This was years ago and not in a RI AMP but I'm quite sure it is happening to some degree as it happens everywhere that there are AMPS or Brothels that feature women from other parts of the world. The concern is legitimate though probably not as widespread as some would like us all to believe.

xdamage
07-01-2009, 08:09 PM
Quickly, I think most people don't care about matters that have no affect on them, so while streetwalkers do impact on them to some degree, what happens in clubs outside of their line of sight, mostly not. There are of course busy bodies, do-gooders, and politicians who may care for various reasons (belief they are doing good, or to gain votes, etc.).

Unfortunately I don't know what to think about the human trafficking problem. It too is often out of sight and so out of most people's minds, but it takes only the smallest amount of effort to imagine ourselves in the victims shoes to realize what a horror it must be.

I have no idea if the problem is severe because unless the girls report their kidnapping the stats won't reflect it, but I do worry that customers of prostitutes just don't want to think about the possibility that the smiling lady on their lap is hiding a secret horror.

Dixie_Vancouver
07-01-2009, 08:31 PM
I have no idea if the problem is severe because unless the girls report their kidnapping the stats won't reflect it, but I do worry that customers of prostitutes just don't want to think about the possibility that the smiling lady on their lap is hiding a secret horror.

I completely agree.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-01-2009, 09:13 PM
I believe kidnapping is against the law so that can be prosecuted without additional laws. They use buzz words like terrorist, pedophile and kidnapping to sway the populace. It works like a charm.

xdamage
07-01-2009, 09:35 PM
^^^Right, yea see every time a kidnapping happens a buzzer goes off in the police office, and they run right out and prosecute the bad guys. Because of course it would never occur to those dealing in human trafficking that it is against the law and all, and of course really what is the problem anyway? The kidnapped need only take a few moments out of their busy schedule being raped repeatedly for money to run down to the police office and file a kidnapping report form 106b.

Those damn buzz words are the real problem.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-01-2009, 09:51 PM
How many prostitution arrests also result in kidnapping charges? One in a ten thousand if that. Now if they want to do away with "human trafficking", buzz word of the day, they should enforce the immigration laws.

Oh no immigration laws, anti buzz word.

xdamage
07-02-2009, 04:49 AM
How many prostitution arrests also result in kidnapping charges? One in a ten thousand if that.


Where are these 1 in 10,000 statistics cited?

But see in the Netherlands, after prostitution became legal and everyone thought all problems were solved, yet who would have predicted, human trafficking went way up! Who knows, maybe your on to something... make it even easier for the traffickers by not having LE arresting the girls and interviewing them?

http://www.expatica.com/nl/news/local_news/Increase-in-human-trafficking-in-Netherlands_49349.html

http://crossroadsmag.eu/2009/02/dutch-authorities-register-809-human-trafficking-victims/

but hey it is not just NL...

http://www.unodc.org/newsletter/en/perspectives/no03/page009.html

"Some 2.5 million people throughout the world are at any given time recruited, entrapped, transported and exploited-a process called human trafficking-according to estimates of international experts. Many believe this number represents the tip of a much greater iceberg. "

Then again it could also be that many of those trafficked don't know exactly who it is behind the trafficking, like they don't get invited to the member meetings? ::) Or like you know, they are brainwashed, addicted to drugs, not brought up to fight back, threatened with having their family killed, threatened with additional personal horrors if they don't play along, the less cooperative ones have already been killed, etc?

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Prostitution_in_the_Netherlands?t=5.#5.

"Many victims of human trafficking are led to believe by organized criminals that they are being offered work in hotels or restaurants or in child care and are forced into prostitution with the threat or actual use of violence. Estimates of the number of victims vary from 1000 to 7000 on a yearly basis"

Of course it could also just be that customers are doing what people do, seeing things from a POV that most benefits them. Like it is deeply disturbing to imagine oneself benefiting from human trafficking, that while your getting-your-rocks-off, the provider is deep inside crying about yet another rape? That it could be someone close to us, a daughter say forced into sexual slavery, but hey... that's not the other guys problem is it? Don't try to upset him with buzzwords that might make him think twice.

Me, I think I'll stick to my worry that while I despise the government poking its nose into my personal business, there is a very worrisome darkside to decriminalizing prostitution, basically what is happening in NL right now. Without the police arresting prostitutes, there is very good chance that human trafficking will go up dramatically in this country (like it did in NL). I can't just ignore it as a buzzword problem.

bem401
07-02-2009, 05:30 AM
The human trafficking problem as it has been presented in Providence is that some of the 30 or so AMPs are part of an organized network of spas spanning the Northeast US. The girls are brought in illegally from Korea under false pretenses and put to work in a spa. They apparently are often housed in a separate part of the building. Girls are rotated from city to city. They are illegal aliens and speak little or no English, have little, if any cash, dont drive, etc, etc ,etc, so their options are limited.

bem401
07-02-2009, 07:28 AM
From what I have read the big difference in the two bills was what penalty, if any, were the owners of property to get if prostitution were found there.

I think there were also differences in how the escorts and the johns would be penalized as well.

Technically speaking, running an establishment that facilitates indoor (legal) prostitution has always been illegal.

Prostitution didn't become legal here intentionally. A smart lawyer found a loophole is a poorly-worded law that made it impossible to prosecute and convict any type of prostitution other then streetwalking.

yoda57us
07-02-2009, 08:45 AM
The human trafficking problem as it has been presented in Providence is that some of the 30 or so AMPs are part of an organized network of spas spanning the Northeast US. The girls are brought in illegally from Korea under false pretenses and put to work in a spa. They apparently are often housed in a separate part of the building. Girls are rotated from city to city. They are illegal aliens and speak little or no English, have little, if any cash, dont drive, etc, etc ,etc, so their options are limited.

This pretty much sums it up. I used to go to AMPS in California quite a bit and eventually hooked up with an indie girl who had come into the US that way. It's not like women are being pulled into vans on the street. It is much more subtle than that. Don't forget these women want to come to the US so it's very easy to lie to get them here and then force them into sex by withholding their passport and ID.

Actually, when RI was busting AMPS a few years ago it was not for prostitution. They where shutting them down for operating without a massage license and calling INS on the women. The customers where walking away without even getting questioned.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-02-2009, 05:05 PM
Where are these 1 in 10,000 statistics cited?


Find one prostitution arrest that resulted in a human trafficking victim being freed and I will show you ten thousand that didn't.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-02-2009, 05:12 PM
Actually, when RI was busting AMPS a few years ago it was not for prostitution. They where shutting them down for operating without a massage license and calling INS on the women. The customers where walking away without even getting questioned.
Yes enforce the immigration laws simple oh so simple. So simple that is why I call bull shit on the human trafficking line. Are all of these women so controlled they don't flag down a cop when they are on the street alone? They know what they are doing and don't want to go back home.

xdamage
07-02-2009, 07:11 PM
Yes enforce the immigration laws simple oh so simple. So simple that is why I call bull shit on the human trafficking line. Are all of these women so controlled they don't flag down a cop when they are on the street alone? They know what they are doing and don't want to go back home.

So you are saying, if you were born and raised in a 3rd world country, young, female, and a bunch of guys 2-3x your size told you there were going to kill you, your family, after torturing you for a month. that you, unlike them, would head over to the donut shop while your captures did what? and flag down a cop?

Or.. alternatively... you are saying, well, they really like it in the USA... getting raped is not so bad really.

Couldn't it just be that the thought of what is really going on is so heinous you can't cope with it and are intellectualizing it away with bravado from the safety of an arm chair?

Earl_the_Pearl
07-02-2009, 07:20 PM
Couldn't it just be that the thought of what is really going on is so heinous you can't cope with it and are intellectualizing it away with bravado from the safety of an arm chair?
If you are so concerned why not have immigration check these places every day? Enforcing the immigration laws is the answer but they don't really care about human trafficking.

xdamage
07-02-2009, 07:23 PM
...but they don't really care about human trafficking.

On this we agree.. reality is people mostly don't care because it doesn't directly affect them.

Earl_the_Pearl
07-02-2009, 08:01 PM
On this we agree.. reality is people mostly don't care because it doesn't directly affect them.
So you do agree the push in RI to make indoor prostitution illegal has nothing to do with human trafficking.

xdamage
07-02-2009, 08:05 PM
So you do agree the push in RI to make indoor prostitution illegal has nothing to do with human trafficking.

no it is not all or nothing dude... it has something to do with it... just maybe it is not as bad as some other trade offs

CFMNH44
08-14-2009, 06:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by CFMNH44 http://forum.stripperweb.com/images/themes/sw4/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://forum.stripperweb.com/showthread.php?p=1816295#post1816295)
They showed a female hair stylist that 'would do anything she could' to close what she referred to as Asian Massage Parlor businesses on her street. I wonder if she would feel the same if PETA demanded she be closed for violating animals in the testing products she uses? The reporter also referenced the recent Craig’s List assault on a prostitute in RI as a reason.



Point one:
I'm willing to bet that if you owned a business that was patronized primarily by women next to an AMP you would be trying to get it closed as well.

Point two:
In the 21st century many companies manufacture and market products for the professional cosmetologist that are not developed with the use of animal testing. Let's not cloud the issue with your personal agenda...

It's been awhile since I visited this thread, but the point that I was trying to make is that someone will always be offended by what someone else does. I have not visited the area to know if it is obvious or not that men walking by the hair salon are going into the AMP. In some respects the present law favors 'civilian' women workers and customers of the salon in that they will not be mistaken for prostitutes and propositioned on the street.

Although the politicians are blustering that they are working on reconciling the two bills, one really wonders how serious they really are. I also find it interesting and noble that a group of academics have come out publicly in favor of the present law:

George Washington University professor Ronald Weitzer and Nassau Community College professor Elizabeth Wood said prostitutes who work indoors are less likely to be assaulted, raped or robbed.
They said treating indoor and outdoor prostitution differently is a step in the right direction.
House and Senate lawmakers have backed sharply different bills that would ban indoor prostitution. They are trying to reach a compromise before a vote expected in September.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,536292,00.html (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,536292,00.html)

http://www.projo.com/news/content/PROSTITUTION_BILLS_08-14-09_1FFAQSN_v101.38aee24.html (http://www.projo.com/news/content/PROSTITUTION_BILLS_08-14-09_1FFAQSN_v101.38aee24.html)

Maybe time to make a trip to see a soon to disappear natural resource? ;)

bem401
08-21-2009, 07:23 PM
I heard this week that there have been meetings going on between General Assembly staffers, the Attorney General's office, and various law enforcement agencies to facilitate the reconciliation of the two bills so a law can be enacted in September.. I have no reason to doubt its veracity.

yoda57us
08-23-2009, 09:15 AM
I heard this week that there have been meetings going on between General Assembly staffers, the Attorney General's office, and various law enforcement agencies to facilitate the reconciliation of the two bills so a law can be enacted in September.. I have no reason to doubt its veracity.

I have no doubt the various legislative bodies will wind up on the same page sooner rather than later. My question is will the ACLU try to block passage?

Note: I'm not saying that would be good or bad, just waiting to see what will happen.

TROU8LE~
09-24-2009, 11:50 AM
As a dancer, Why the f*ck would you want to legalize prostitution? I made alot more money b4 RI got all laid-back w/ their laws. When they were strict back in 98'-04 $$$ was flying. You didnt have to work! Work was frigging great. Why do some chics sell themselves so short now adays?!?--- thats the question..

xdamage
09-25-2009, 06:35 AM
A few things....

98-04 was a different economic period, basically the tech-boom era. So that changed.

Societies, like people, change as "they grow up" except societies are constantly being renewed with new people born, older people dying. As long as things are going well (i.e., no war or catastrophe or poverty) it tends to be true (I think) that societies tend to become more liberal. Each generation upping the bar, building on liberalism of those before them.

Things change. Business changes. It is not just stripping either. It is true of multiple areas of life and business. What is profitable one day is not necessarily tomorrow. Either competitors swoop in, what customers want changes, or something better comes along. There are exceptions, fundamental needs, like health care but even those business change.

You can't turn back the hands of time when it comes to social trends or business trends; only move forward. Things can revert but the circumstances need to rewind history in regards to stripping would probably require a catastrophe, war, etc.

The proliferation of porn, and sexual liberalism is going to feed into a new wave of society that will increasingly require more of the drug we call sex to get high.

Finally while dancers should lobby for what they want, my guess is that if the laws change in regards to prostitution it will not be because of whether or not it helps the SC industry. The matters that will move people to change will revolve around "my body my rights", "we want less government involvement in what we do in the bedroom", "separation of church and state", "freedom of speech". People can get behind higher good reasons like this. It's not realistic to expect them to be primarily concerned with changing the laws in ways primarily motivated by what is best for the SC industry. Sad but true.

threlayer
10-29-2009, 11:04 AM
As a dancer, Why the f*ck would you want to legalize prostitution? I made alot more money b4 RI got all laid-back w/ their laws. When they were strict back in 98'-04 $$$ was flying. You didnt have to work! Work was frigging great. Why do some chics sell themselves so short now adays?!?--- thats the question..

This is a simple one. Legalize prostitution and regulate where is can and cannot occur. Keep it out of places dealing with sex where intercourse is not appropriate such as strip clubs or public places like on the street. that way dancers can tell whose who ask for sex that it is available at this or that location. And if she wants the date she can tell him where to go so they can be together. It improves freedom for both that way.

Earl_the_Pearl
10-29-2009, 11:10 AM
Will prostitution laws relax? No.

PROVIDENCE—Rhode Island lawmakers expect they will finally close a loophole allowing indoor prostitution during the last day of a special session.

threlayer
10-29-2009, 11:17 AM
...It seems, based on what I read on various boards, that there are more hookers working in the clubs and in AMPS than there are on the street. Ultimately, streetwalkers are what the voting public complains about...

At first blush this would seem to be true. But there is an undercurrent out there that is concerned with family stability.

Wives may well believe that randy husbands may tend to go toward professionals with no strings than toward women who may want their husbands. This would seem safer for them, but because of the additional safety factor being more temptiing to wander-oriented men, and their desire for exclusivity, which they were promised, they want prostitution to not be a temptation for their men. While they may not be universal feelings, it is true commonly enough that politicians want this issue not to bite at them come election time.

threlayer
06-23-2010, 08:40 AM
I suspect that, even in the old Storyville (in New Orleans), this will not happen because of the concomitant crime issue that always seems to follow prostitution. Not that NOLA couldn't use the income/taxes from regulated prostitution. It's just that in NOLA nothing can be well-regulated.