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BarbieBite
09-11-2013, 07:04 PM
My mother told me she heard that dancers from ricks in NYC sued them and the judge ruled in their favor. Also that in NYC they might start paying us minimum wage as well. DoDoes anyone know if any of this is true?

r2468
09-11-2013, 08:46 PM
FYI

http://news.msn.com/us/ny-strip-club-dancers-win-fight-for-minimum-wage?stay=1

BarbieBite
09-11-2013, 09:38 PM
Thank you for clearing that up!

Tsepmet1
09-12-2013, 12:35 AM
Any comments on this from the ladies?

arielbriel
09-12-2013, 01:20 AM
My manager says it wont change anything.

Melonie
09-12-2013, 03:29 AM
The latest attention-getter is that Ricks has lost a class action suit brought by dancers seeking 'employee' status thus minimum wage payments etc.


(snip)Via NY Times,

Rick’s, a chain of “upscale adult nightclubs serving primarily businessmen and professionals” based in Texas, argued that its dancers were independent contractors, more akin to stand-up comedians than fry cooks. But Judge Engelmayer was not persuaded. He said the list of rules Rick’s laid down could be described as “micromanagement.”

Among the dos and don’ts detailed in the company’s pamphlet of “Entertainer Guidelines” were requirements that the dancers work eight-hour shifts at least three days a week, wear stiletto heels at least four inches tall, skip body glitter and cover any tattoos with makeup.

The decision also said the dancers were mandated to “dance your first song with your dress on and your second song with your dress off.” Then, while entertaining the customers up close and personally, they were to keep one foot on the floor and could never have both knees “on a guest” at the same time.

On Tuesday, as Vanessa gyrated on the main stage, the other dancers on the day shift appeared to be obeying the rules as they coaxed men into $20 lap dances or to splurge on a visit to a “private room” upstairs — at a rate of $150 for every 15 minutes.

“These women don’t have their own business — Rick’s has a business and they work there,” said Ms. Drake, a partner in the Nichols Kaster law firm. “Adult entertainers, like every other worker in this country, are entitled to receive wages and not be forced to rely on tips from their customers to make a living.”

She declined to say how much her clients were seeking in back pay, but it would be more than the minimum wage of $7.25 for every hour worked by every dancer since the club opened.

the ruling would have “no impact on Rick’s Cabaret New York City, since we changed our independent contractor practices some time ago.” He said minimum wages would amount to “a fraction of the $1,000 or more” that some dancers said they earned in a night’s work."(snip)


I would take the comments that this ruling will have 'no impact' for Rick's dancers in NY with a 'grain of salt'. For starters, this successful 'employee' dancer lawsuit against yet another club chain arguably provides more leverage for state DOL's, state tax agencies etc. to push for 'employee' treatment of ALL dancers. As discussed in other threads, 'employee' status / treatment results in more tax revenues being collected from the clubs and dancers, as well as more state unemployment and disability insurance fund revenues being collected from the clubs.

Also, the press coverage once again widely publicizes the fact that some dancers are earning $1,000+ per night ... a point which won't be overlooked by the NY state and city tax agencies !

charlotte.
09-12-2013, 03:44 AM
My manager says it wont change anything.

that's good to hear. most of the time these settlements make a change for the worse except for 2 cases I've witnessed- sf djv and lv sr. sf djv got rid of all house fees (now they just take a base + % of dances done) and while sr increased their funny money cut, we can choose to have them withhold all of our min wage which could result in having to owe no additional taxes next year or getting $ back, plus tons of girls left so my money has gone up. I think that having one employee only club in all the big cities could be a good thing to give local girls a more consistent environment with less drama but lord knows the managers would probably fuck it up.

keep us updated! I'm probably moving to nyc soon and last time I was there I didn't really take dancing as seriously as I am now so Ill be checking this thread :)

michele11
09-12-2013, 06:46 AM
^ You still have to pay taxes on all your money earned. Just because your paid minimum wage and they take taxes out doesn't make you exempt from paying taxes on the money you EARN. Vip in Chicago has paid minimum wage sine I worked there in 98 and you still get 1099 on all funny money( which you pay taxes on, a copy gotes to the IRS and you still pay on all income earned. I don't know who gave you that poor tax advice.

Noelle_Noir
09-12-2013, 07:18 AM
It happened in Syracuse too! The Department of Labor sued the owner,we all got a check for back late fees,stage fees,house fees....It started a few years ago...It took them years too find all the girls.I got a check for 1800...Mine was one of the larger checks
.

charlotte.
09-12-2013, 10:20 PM
^ You still have to pay taxes on all your money earned. Just because your paid minimum wage and they take taxes out doesn't make you exempt from paying taxes on the money you EARN. Vip in Chicago has paid minimum wage sine I worked there in 98 and you still get 1099 on all funny money( which you pay taxes on, a copy gotes to the IRS and you still pay on all income earned. I don't know who gave you that poor tax advice.

I don't think u read what I wrote correctly. we can opt to have 100% of the min wage instead of whatever thr tax rate is so at the end of the year, it is very possible that that would be enough for your entire tax obligation and in some cases where girls had a lot of deductions/reductions they could even get money back at the end of the year.

Melonie
09-13-2013, 03:32 AM
^^^ it remains to be seen whether having the 'balance' of your minimum wage earnings ( after SSI and other payroll taxes are taken out ) totally applied toward estimated taxes via the club's payroll system, versus total taxes due on your 1099 income, will actually cover / result in a tax refund.

charlotte.
09-13-2013, 03:46 AM
^^^ it remains to be seen whether having the 'balance' of your minimum wage earnings ( after SSI and other payroll taxes are taken out ) totally applied toward estimated taxes via the club's payroll system, versus total taxes due on your 1099 income, will actually cover / result in a tax refund.

its how a lot of the other employees (like djs) do it. obviously it is case dependent, but for some situations you will get a refund. this is not heresay, this is what employees who have been doing their taxes like this for years already have told us dancers to help us choose how much we want withheld.

also keep in mind that many dancers are students, mothers, or part time (so low yearly income even tho high hourly rate) so its not hard to get our tax bill to be effectively zero each year. this is my first year without tuition write offs so I'm taking advantage of the n
min wage thing but in the past I have gotten money back or "zeroed out." so many dancers won't have to worry about the min wage covering ~30% of total revenue because few of us actually owe that much.

michele11
09-13-2013, 05:56 AM
My ex was a dj( now manages the club) did it like that too because he made 5.00 an hour. When we went to court for child support issues he tried to claim he made , what the club paid him and the judge tore him a new asshole. When I waitressed I didn't make a quarter of what I made dancing and got 2.00 an hour and still had to claim tips and pay. Just because people get away with it and don't get audited doesn't mean you can make 2-1000 a shift and exempt from paying taxes on it. Even when I worked mainly in Chicago and got minimum wage I still owed like 6000 in taxes. I'm a mother too and can tell you I've been doing my taxes 20 years andnever got a refund.

charlotte.
09-13-2013, 07:52 AM
I don't know why you think we're cheating the system. we get 7.25/hr and we can choose all of it to be withheld. at the end of the year we do our taxes normally and for girls that have saving issues this will help them a lot because a big portion, if not all, of what they owe will have been withheld so they won't have to come up with extra $ for the irs.

I was just trying to explain how sometimes being an employee of a club can be a good thing for some girls. in previous years I had ~$30k tuition reductions so I never had to worry every year about paying taxes and usually got refunds. this year is my first without it and im very glad that I work in a club that withholds tax money for me. just pointing out that employee status isn't 100% gloom and doom. I'm really not sure why you're trying to say I'm giving bad tax advice lol.

michele11
09-13-2013, 02:51 PM
^ Because you are giving inaccurate info. The hourly wage is what you pay taxes on just like a wairess but you still have to claim all vip and tip money. Lol , your not getting the gist of this I guess. By the way I know dj's who were audited because of this. All I'm saying is you need to contact an accountant that knows what he's doing. Hell a lot of accountants tell people they can right off things that are not actual deductions( you'd be surprised how many accountants don't know what are legitimate right offs in our business. My gf was one of the ones audited that worked at scores in the hey day and the I.R.S. agent said she could right off her gowns( which most dancers think is legitimate( just because the I.R.S doesn't catch it doesn't make it legitimate) and she ended up owing 12,000. Just saying before you go telling girls that because they're employees now they don't have to pay taxes IS inaccurate info. I made 600 a week waitressing and still had to pay taxes even though I made a base pay, same as when I worked at a strip club that paid hourly....

charlotte.
09-13-2013, 03:21 PM
I thought I was clear that the reason why I and others are choosing to have all of the min wage withheld is because we will use that towards our tax bill for our entite revenue that year...including tips and vips. like if I made $10k in min wage, they would withhold all $10k, so then at the end of the year when it turns out I've made $50k total then that $10k will make a huge dent if not completely cover what I owe. that's why I brought it up- its like someone is forcing you to save for the irs which is really helpful for girls without self control. of course lots of girls will have to pay additional but the min wage will still make a big difference in what they owe and girls that work infrequently (so are closer to the poverty line), have tons of deductions, most significantly kids and tuition may even get a refund.

lol I would never say we don't have to report our tips/vips in part because the club is also reporting them too. I think were getting a 1099 too but it might be another similar form I've never heard of. its really confusing lol.

michele11
09-13-2013, 04:20 PM
Ok so you aren't going to keep any of the wage. Then depending you might not owe. I just saw a thing on tv were the I.R.S. is making waitresses pay taxes on their tips and were interviewing waitresses. I waitresses back in the early 90's and we did then? Weird.

michele11
09-13-2013, 04:21 PM
Waitressed.

charlotte.
09-13-2013, 06:29 PM
yeah we're actually supposed to declare our tips at the end of each night which is irritating but probably their way of avoiding an automatic mass audit lol.

Melonie
09-14-2013, 05:36 PM
^^^ I can't say that this will absolutely happen, but the IRS does routinely run computer comparisons of multiple employee tax returns who all work for the same 'employer'. If 30% of the 'employee' dancers wind up reporting $10k annual earnings while another 30% wind up reporting $100k in annual earnings, it's a damn good bet that the mass audits you mention will indeed actually happen soon after next April 15th !!!

arielbriel
09-15-2013, 10:28 PM
I'm very worried about being audited.

charlotte.
09-16-2013, 10:06 AM
^^^ I can't say that this will absolutely happen, but the IRS does routinely run computer comparisons of multiple employee tax returns who all work for the same 'employer'. If 30% of the 'employee' dancers wind up reporting $10k annual earnings while another 30% wind up reporting $100k in annual earnings, it's a damn good bet that the mass audits you mention will indeed actually happen soon after next April 15th !!!

really? so every commission based business is frequently masss audited? hair salons, sales ppl, bankers, lawyers, these are all industries where it is very common to get paid hourly (or base salary) and then have your commission or bonus be dramatically different from your peers.

like I said before, this is exactly how the other employees have been doing their taxes for years and there has been no mass audit. the amount in tips waitresses make varies just as much as dancers. other clubs also have done employee transitions and have not gotten mass audited-my friend was at one that went from ic to employee back to ic and nobody got audited, much less a club wide audit. they have better things to do than individual audit every employee at one business.

arielbriel
09-16-2013, 02:21 PM
They can audit every IC that it seems like they underreported. When some girls are claiming LOTS of money and others are not, and the owner is saying that many of the girls make $1000 a night, I cannot see why they wouldn't look into it further.

Melonie
09-16-2013, 03:02 PM
^^^ actually over the past couple of years there have been targeted mass audits of cabdrivers, and also of casino waitstaffs, due to the perception of widespread 'cheating' on tip income reporting. The latter resulted in pressure on the employer casinos to institute 'tip sharing', with tip income having to be reported through the casino's payroll system.

michele11
09-16-2013, 04:15 PM
really? so every commission based business is frequently masss audited? hair salons, sales ppl, bankers, lawyers, these are all industries where it is very common to get paid hourly (or base salary) and then have your commission or bonus be dramatically different from your peers.

like I said before, this is exactly how the other employees have been doing their taxes for years and there has been no mass audit. the amount in tips waitresses make varies just as much as dancers. other clubs also have done employee transitions and have not gotten mass audited-my friend was at one that went from ic to employee back to ic and nobody got audited, much less a club wide audit. they have better things to do than individual audit every employee at one business.

Like I said earlier in this thread....just because others are doing it and not getting audited doesn't mean it's legal. If you don't take any of the 9 sn hour or whatever they're paying you and you make less than 40,000 and have tons of right offs you may not owe but like I said earlier when you stated no one was going to owe because you were employees getting paid you were extremely wrong and I've been filing as a I.C. for almost 20 years so I know what I'm talking about.

2 tons of fun
09-17-2013, 04:45 AM
........

Eric Stoner
09-18-2013, 09:55 AM
Now three dancers are suing the Flashdancers chain for the same thing . Flash, Private Eyes and N.Y. Dolls were named.

Starling
09-18-2013, 12:00 PM
Now three dancers are suing the Flashdancers chain for the same thing . Flash, Private Eyes and N.Y. Dolls were named.

I was wondering when this was going to happen.

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/strippers-file-10m-lawsuit-strip-club-article-1.1459255

Melonie
09-19-2013, 03:45 AM
^^^ stand by for the New York State DOL and Tax & Finance dep't to again start pushing for a state-wide classification of dancers as 'statutory employees'.

Eric Stoner
09-19-2013, 07:35 AM
Let me ask a stupid question of the dancers here : Would you want to be a "statutory employee " or would you prefer to be an independent contractor ?

If I had the legs for it I don't know what I'd prefer. From my dealings and observations of the skin biz I divide dancers into 3 main groups : Queens , Wallflowers and Hustlers.
Queens have their own regulars and do plenty of lap-dances and VIP's.
Wallflowers seem to wait for everything to come to them and spend a lot of time in the dressing room.
The Hustlers hustle; they WORK.
If I were a "Queen" or a "Hustler" why would I want to be lumped together with the "Wallflowers" ? Why would I want them to get the same shift pay as me ?
At some point isn't there a risk of killing the Golden Goose ? i.e. Just how much are club owners supposed to put up with as far as employee costs. Yes, yes, I know Rick's is a publicly traded corporation and probably has the money and other wherewithal to weather whatever they have to. What about smaller operations with much narrower margins ?
To avoid health insurance costs all a club has to do is make everyone part time. Would you want to see your hours cut ?

I don't have the answers which is why I am asking.

Melonie
09-19-2013, 10:29 AM
If I were a "Queen" or a "Hustler" why would I want to be lumped together with the "Wallflowers" ? Why would I want them to get the same shift pay as me ?

Keep in mind that clubs would need to increase the percentage of their 'take' on the private dances / VIP's sold by the 'Queens' and 'Hustlers' in order to finance the minimum wage salary + worker's comp premiums + unemployment insurance premiums for the 'Wallflowers'. If the casino industry is any precedent, the possibility of 'tip sharing' with all tip money received by dancers being pooled and equally divided up between all dancers may also be a real concern.

In the isolated cases where particular clubs have been forced to implement 'employee' status for dancers, there is usually a quick exodus by the 'Hustlers' who do not wish to give up a larger percentage of their own private dance / VIP sales, and who do not wish to be forced to 'share' their tip money with less industrious dancers.

And no matter what happens in regard to 'redistribution' of employee dancer earnings, the fact remains that for the same X thousands of dollars worth of customer dollars being spent in the club, a portion of those X dollars must now be paid toward state unemployment insurance funds, state disability funds, payroll processing services, etc. This money can thus no longer flow into dancers' or clubowner's pockets.

Eric Stoner
09-19-2013, 10:58 AM
Keep in mind that clubs would need to increase the percentage of their 'take' on the private dances / VIP's sold by the 'Queens' and 'Hustlers' in order to finance the minimum wage salary + worker's comp premiums + unemployment insurance premiums for the 'Wallflowers'. If the casino industry is any precedent, the possibility of 'tip sharing' with all tip money received by dancers being pooled and equally divided up between all dancers may also be a real concern.

In the isolated cases where particular clubs have been forced to implement 'employee' status for dancers, there is usually a quick exodus by the 'Hustlers' who do not wish to give up a larger percentage of their own private dance / VIP sales, and who do not wish to be forced to 'share' their tip money with less industrious dancers.

And no matter what happens in regard to 'redistribution' of employee dancer earnings, the fact remains that for the same X thousands of dollars worth of customer dollars being spent in the club, a portion of those X dollars must now be paid toward state unemployment insurance funds, state disability funds, payroll processing services, etc. This money can thus no longer flow into dancers' or clubowner's pockets.

Yeah. At least the two of us "get it " lol. While I was somewhat sympathetic with SOME of the plaintiffs' complaints I always wondered whether they were being careless about what they were wishing for. An INCREASED house cut ? Tip sharing ? More deductions from paychecks to cover unemployment , disability , withholding ? At the end of the day the bigger clubs with the best accountants and lawyers will do what they always do - fudge , futz and finagle to protect their bottom line while the custies and dancers would foot the bill.

Sophia_Starina
09-19-2013, 11:55 AM
I always wondered whether they were being careless about what they were wishing for.

The principle of the matter is that Clubs, at this point in time, have the cake and eat it too. The Clubs list dancers as independent contractors and offer no wages, no benefits, no guarantee of employment, no severance, no nothing. Yet they enforce schedules, fees, fines, and take portions of earnings. By definition, that level of control lands Clubs squarely in the realm of Employers... not just businesses that work with Independent Contractors. Beyond that, the Clubs have been a pretty sweet exemption from paying a fuck-ton of Taxes.

Is the redefinition of a "stripper" from contractor to employee necessarily beneficial for strippers? I don't know. There are some good and bad points that can be made either way. Have the clubs been huge DICKS by misclassifying strippers into some purgatory-esque-limbo-land of "independent contractors who basically have to act as though they are employees" and reaping the financial benefits of this deliberately grey area? Fuck yes.

charlotte.
09-19-2013, 12:04 PM
I think major cities should have a few employee clubs but not all. give girls and customers options.

Sophia_Starina
09-19-2013, 12:45 PM
I think major cities should have a few employee clubs but not all. give girls and customers options.

What options exactly do you propose be offered to customers???

charlotte.
09-19-2013, 12:53 PM
What options exactly do you propose be offered to customers???

employee clubs might be able to regulate the girls better (altho that has yet to be seen here in lv). customers might appreciate a club that has more strict and specific requirements on appearance and behavior. I'm basically envisioning a club where girls are held to a higher standard, getting a reputation as being a classier club.

I really just want bitches to stop wearing leggings on the damn floor.

Melonie
09-19-2013, 01:20 PM
customers might appreciate a club that has more strict and specific requirements on appearance and behavior. I'm basically envisioning a club where girls are held to a higher standard, getting a reputation as being a classier club.

This is a wonderful concept in theory. However, in the 'real world', the most industrious dancers with the best appearances are highly likely to quit working in any club that classifies them as employees thus confiscating a larger percentage of their private dance / VIP earnings, potentially confiscating a significant amount of their higher than average tip earnings, denying them 'business expense' related tax deductions, etc. Thus the 'class' level of a club that is forced to classify dancers as 'employees' is more apt to drop than increase.

Also, another 'real world' consideration is that, under the 'letter of the law' re IRS income reporting, there is only one source of income still remaining to 'employee' dancers that will not be fully reported and subjected to disability, unemployment, taxes, 'sharing' with the club and potentially with other dancers, etc. That source of income is direct cash payments received from club customers in exchange for the dancer providing 'extras'. This serves as yet another reason to expect the 'class' level of a club that is forced to classify dancers as 'employees' to drop.



I think major cities should have a few employee clubs but not all. give girls and customers options

Given that the vast majority of state and local gov'ts are 'broke', and that the majority of state unemployment and disability insurance funds are beyond 'broke' ( they owe money to the federal gov't ) , the idea of being able to collect more tax revenues and more unemployment and disability insurance fund contributions from 'employee' dancers gives state and local gov'ts a strong vested interest in seeing EVERY dancer ( outside of features and agency contracted travelling dancers ) classified as a statutory employee ! However, as was mentioned earlier, a handful of upscale clubs with expensive attorneys and fat political contribution budgets will likely be able to hang onto their 'independent contractor' dancer status - based on the fact that they bring in feature dancers and/or agency dancers. Thus my guess is that Flash will escape this lawsuit, while the other clubs probably will not.



The principle of the matter is that Clubs, at this point in time, have the cake and eat it too. The Clubs list dancers as independent contractors and offer no wages, no benefits, no guarantee of employment, no severance, no nothing. Yet they enforce schedules, fees, fines, and take portions of earnings. By definition, that level of control lands Clubs squarely in the realm of Employers

All true ... unfortunately !!! But in 'real world' terms, active working dancers being reclassified as 'employees' as a result of these lawsuits ... which are always brought by RETIRED dancers seeking cash without 'consequences' ... is a Phyrric Victory at best.

(snip)From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Pyrrhic victory is a victory with such a devastating cost that it is tantamount to defeat. Someone who wins a Pyrrhic victory has been victorious in some way; however, the heavy toll negates any sense of achievement or profit."(snip)



I'm basically envisioning a club where girls are held to a higher standard, getting a reputation as being a classier club.

This is actually very likely to happen ... but not at 'employee' dancer clubs ! Instead, the top earning dancers in clubs that reclassify their dancers as 'employees' are likely to migrate to upscale independent contractor dancer clubs in big cities which are able to appeal to an equally upscale base of club customers. Unfortunately, like the upscale club customer base which consists of Americans in the top 5-10% earnings bracket, the girls able to be hired by upscale big city clubs will only be the top 5-10% of dancers in terms of appearance and 'hustle'. That in turn leaves the other 90-95% of dancers facing the choice of earning 'peanuts' in an 'employee' dancer club, or adding 'extras' to their menu.



While I was somewhat sympathetic with SOME of the plaintiffs' complaints I always wondered whether they were being careless about what they were wishing for. An INCREASED house cut ? Tip sharing ? More deductions from paychecks to cover unemployment , disability , withholding ?

Again it's necessary to keep in mind that the FORMER dancers bringing these lawsuits will not be impacted by any of the 'fallout' from the reclassification of current dancers as statutory employees. The FORMER dancers get to pocket a semi-decent sized cash settlement / back wages payment and walk away. Present and future dancers are the ones that will be stuck living with the 'fallout'. Hell, I could sign on to the Flash lawsuit and I haven't actively danced for the past 3 years !!! Obviously I won't of course because I don't want to draw ANY additional attention from the IRS / NY tax dep't for any reason ... and certainly not for the few thousand dollars that will be paid out if the lawsuit is actually successful.



Where I work about 10 to 20% of dancers I have spoken too or heard, talking about it have paid taxes since dancing, this is what worries me. All of a sudden you have all these employees/dancers claiming money that started on the first day of being employees. Obviously july/august 2013 was not their first day working there.

Indeed, the IRS and state tax people aren't stupid. As posted earlier, after casino waitstaff and cabdrivers were reclassified as statutory employees, a major targeted program of audits soon followed which attempted to 'recoup' unpaid taxes on undeclared earnings from the previous 3 years while still working as independent contractors. Even if just a small percentage of the actual unpaid tax money on previous years' independent contractor earnings is able to be recouped via 'settlement agreements' and payment plans, this additional tax revenue money is still a 'windfall' for the IRS and state tax people in the current year. Beyond that, the IRS and state tax people can be confident that they will receive 'full' tax revenues for current and future years' earnings, thanks to the club being forced to implement a payroll system with automatic income reporting, with estimated tax withholding etc. to comply with federal / state law for payment of 'employees'.

charlotte.
09-19-2013, 03:00 PM
well you can speculate all you want but my reality is that I am making more ever since we turned over to employee only and I am a high quality girl! our quality overall has remained the same but I think it would improve if they bothered to enforce more rules, however that won't happen at a club this big especially when so many of our girls aren't local.

Melonie
09-19-2013, 03:20 PM
^^^ fair enough. However, with similar fairness, your transition to 'employee' dancer status is very recent ... and a significant reason that your own earnings potential remains good is that there are now fewer girls working in your club ( due to an exodus of dancers who didn't choose to work under 'employee' dancer conditions ) while the number of customers remains more or less unchanged. Please check back 6 months from now, after all of the ramifications of the 'employee' dancer status change have had a chance to work through your local strip club scene.

My own 'speculations' are at least partly based on actual observations of the changes which have taken place after individual clubs were mandated to start treating their dancers as 'employees' ... some with more than 10 years worth of 'history' since they lost their 'employee dancer' lawsuits.



It happened in Syracuse too! The Department of Labor sued the owner

actually Fantasy Nights was one of my first experiences with an 'employee' dancer club ... I left the club as soon as I found out ! Is this club still in business ???

charlotte.
09-19-2013, 04:15 PM
^yah I agree, I think that it'll still be overwhelmingly positive in 6 months but I also agree that some clubs have turned to shit after losing lawsuits and part of that has to do with creating lose lose scenarios (like upping fees and percentages from girls without actuallt providing stability/insurance or anything like that).

arielbriel
09-20-2013, 04:41 PM
Where I work about 10 to 20% of dancers I have spoken too or heard, talking about it have paid taxes since dancing, this is what worries me. All of a sudden you have all these employees/dancers claiming money that started on the first day of being employees. Obviously july/august 2013 was not their first day working there. What do you think that is gonna cause for the rest of us who actually paid our taxes? There will be too much heat on our profession due to this and these other lawsuits that claim dancers make thousands in one night, when thats not even realistic, even more so in this economy. I dont even see these lawsuits really highlighting the fact that we all pay to work and that we can actually leave negative.

What I was told is that they did go over that. They got asked under oath what could girls make at working at Ricks, and the response was "It depends but sometimes girls leave negative and other times they make up to a $1000 in a night". The media took the snippet they knew would cause a big fuss and left out the rest. Again, this is just what I heard. I'm not happy about that being out there, though.

Melonie
09-21-2013, 12:57 AM
^^^ re the public record statements of dancers earning $1000 a night, indeed such statements tend to draw attention from state tax agencies etc.

arielbriel
09-21-2013, 04:52 AM
That's what im worried about.

Djoser
09-21-2013, 08:36 AM
They are ruining it for almost all other dancers and stripclub employees. For not such great benefit to themselves. The lawyers are the real winners in these cases.

michele11
09-21-2013, 03:45 PM
They are ruining it for almost all other dancers and stripclub employees. For not such great benefit to themselves. The lawyers are the real winners in these cases.

Exactly!

jenise_filmmaker
09-24-2013, 07:58 AM
Hi ladies,

I am producing a 30-minute documentary about what society perceives as empowerment/disempowerment within adult entertainment. I think it's really important to highlight women who have taken legal action against their clubs -- for back wages, minimum wage, etc -- and have already interviewed lawyers on the subject. Now I am looking for one or two women who would be willing (and able--I know you might have confidentiality agreements) to go on camera and talk about how the lawsuit has affected your life for better, worse, etc. I'm looking to film between October 12 and 16. We would need at least one full day to film with you, maybe two. I live in New York City but can travel, depending on where you live. For security reasons, I'm happy to conceal your location and other person details in the film. We can discuss. Please note that since this is a documentary, there is no financial compensation.

If you or someone you know might be interested, please contact me at jenise(dot)morgan(at)gmail(dot)com. Thank you so much!!

arielbriel
09-25-2013, 01:45 AM
Nothing in NYC has gone through yet so it hasn't affected any of us YET. Of course the attorneys are springing to do this documentary for you. FML. SIGH.

jenise_filmmaker
09-25-2013, 12:30 PM
Hey Ariel,

I've heard that perspective from a few dancers and would be really interested to hear more about your opinion and frustrations--not on camera, just on the phone or email.. whatever is comfortable. The class action suits get a lot of press and I think it's important to get more detail, more dancers' opinions.

-Jenise
jenise(dot)morgan(at)gmail(dot)com