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View Full Version : Political Stereotyping- the Other Discrimination



Lilith
11-05-2004, 03:48 PM
Disclaimer: Full-blown pet peeve rant to follow. I make no claims to the intellectual superiority of the following comments, merely that this irritates the holy piss out of me.

Published in my local paper.
"[Democratic] Party strategists had long hoped to supplant their political losses in the Midwest and South with growth in the Hispanic-rich Western states, but those plans were put in doubt Tuesday night... Two-thirds of Hispanics said they were not born-again Christians and more than 80 percent declined to identify moral values as their top issue, suggesting they have more in common with Republicans than Democrats."

What's this you say? A majority of Hispanics are not fundamentalists and an overwhelming majority were not voting based on moral values, and this makes them more like Republicans? Now, that doesn't make much sense.

...

Oh yes, that might be because the article was written a wee bit differently. Like this: "One-third of Hispanics said they were born-again Christians and nearly 20 percent listed moral values as their top issue, suggesting they have more in common with Republicans than Democrats."

Same statistics applied with spin to make it come out like they wanted. What a bunch of poppycock.

Reason number 2 this irritates me; I simply cannot abide the arrogance implicit in assuming what a person thinks and votes based on their heritage. A Hispanic is inherently neither Republican or Democrat; they are nothing more than an individual who happens to share a common heritage with millions of other people. To say that a person "ought to be" voting or thinking in a predictable way merely because of their last name or skin color is just plain racist. "Oh, that county/state has a lot of Hispanics, so we'll get their votes for sure..." Arrogant little gits. This is no different, IMO, than a policeman pulling over a black at night simply because he thinks it's likely to catch a black man doing something wrong. Assuming you know plenty about a person merely because of their skin color; wrong, wrong, wrong. Bastards.

[/rant]

Casual Observer
11-05-2004, 03:57 PM
What's this you say? A majority of Hispanics are not fundamentalists and an overwhelming majority were not voting based on moral values, and this makes them more like Republicans? Now, that doesn't make much sense.

This is because most Hispanics with a religious preference--especially first or second generation Mexican immigrants--are Catholic. And not Northeastern Catholic either... (read here: Kerry's weak ass response on abortion didn't fly).

But your point is well taken and remains the same. This is how the lamestream media does its level best to advance agendas.

Jay Zeno
11-05-2004, 04:05 PM
Heck, I've even known fundamentalist Christians who practice live-and-let-live and rabid environmentalists who are anti-abortion.

It's tempting to group people monolithically, especially when you disagree with them. Tempting, but wrong.

doc-catfish
11-05-2004, 04:29 PM
Along these same lines, could we please put an end to assuming because a particular person belongs to a certain party, or group, that ALL their political beliefs fall in line with what our media generalizes such people to be. I've never really found most actual people to be "either/or" ideologically speaking.

Here are two such websites that will leave the "left vs. right" absolutists scratching their heads. Proof that you can't judge a book by its cover.

http://www.feministsforlife.org/

http://www.logcabin.org/logcabin/home.html

Adina
11-05-2004, 08:12 PM
Here are two such websites that will leave the "left vs. right" absolutists scratching their heads. Proof that you can't judge a book by its cover.

http://www.feministsforlife.org/

http://www.logcabin.org/logcabin/home.html
Yes, it's all in a name. Hence, "The People's Republic of China," and "The People's Democratic Republic of Yemen." ::)